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High School Students Win Full Rides to BC

Bluefield College recently hosted some of the region’s most outstanding high school students, who competed for full scholarships to attend the private Christian college as part of the school’s spring Presidential Scholars Day.

Chris Shoemaker

June 13, 2012

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Presidential Scholar Daniel Griffin of Greensboro, North Carolina

 

 

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Presidential Scholar Megan Tennant of Linville, North Carolina

 

 

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Spire Scholar Jessica Meadows of Danville, Virginia

 

 

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Spire Scholar Renee Robbins of Chesapeake, Virginia

 

 

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Spire Scholar Lauren Webster of Ringgold, Virginia

 

 

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Spire Scholar Hannah Winter of Amelia, Virginia

 

 

The 19 exceptional high school students in Bluefield’s prospective student pool spent an hour and a half developing a written composition during an essay competition portion of Presidential Scholars Day, and then went before a Presidential Scholarship Committee to respond to questions during an interview segment of the event.

 

Following an evaluation period and based on their academic credentials, essays and interviews, two of the prospective students -- Daniel Griffin of Greensboro, North Carolina, and Megan Tennant of Linville, North Carolina -- were selected to receive the school’s most valuable scholarship award, the full ride Presidential Scholarship.

 

“The Presidential Scholarship is reserved for the most deserving prospective students and is the most coveted student scholarship award,” said BC’s Mark Hipes, director of traditional admissions. “It covers everything -- full tuition, room, and board.”

 

The Presidential Scholarships are worth $29,120 a year for a four-year total award of $116,480. To even compete for the award, students must have a 3.75 cumulative high school grade point average and a 1,100 composite math and verbal SAT score or a 25 ACT score. They also must submit two letters of recommendation from current teachers.

 

In addition to meeting those qualifications, Griffin is a three-sport athlete in baseball, golf, and football. A home-schooled student, he also is the drummer for his church worship band and serves on the Advisory Board for Journey’s youth ministry. In addition, he has been a part of mission teams to Jamaica and Poland.

 

Tennant is a member of Future Farmers of America, Student Government Association, and National Honor Society at Avery County High School, where she also plays basketball and volleyball. An aspiring veterinarian, she has participated in rodeo competitions since the age of two.

 

While not President Scholars, Jessica Meadows of Danville, Virginia, Renee Robbins of Chesapeake, Virginia, Lauren Webster of Ringgold, Virginia, and Hannah Winter of Amelia, Virginia, each earned Spire Scholarships during BC’s Presidential Scholars Day to cover half their expenses to attend the college. Symbolically named to represent the spire on BC’s Harman Chapel, Spire Scholarships are valued at $14,560 a year for a four-year total award of $58,240.

 

“The steeple, oftentimes rising above roof tops and tree lines -- as does Harman Chapel’s as you arrive into Bluefield -- reminds all of us of something beyond ourselves,” said BC President David Olive. “It reminds us of Christ’s presence among us in the communities in which we live, work and serve, a presence that we embody through our acts of love, kindness, grace and forgiveness. I believe it is most appropriate that Bluefield College has this prominent, powerful vestige on its campus, for it truly represents who we are and what we aspire to be.”

 

Meadows is a member of the Tunstall High School Beta Club, Interact Club, and Trojan Club. She also serves as vice president of Student Council and her junior class and is co-captain of the school’s cheerleading squad. In addition, she is a Silver Award recipient for the Girl Scouts of America. She also has interned for the Pittsylvania Historical Society and writes poetry that has been published twice.

 

Robbins, a home-schooled student, is the winner of a Nobility Award for outstanding character, citizenship, and spiritual leadership. An aspiring musician, she began playing the violin at age six and has since won the Bay Youth Orchestra of Virginia’s Seasoned Musician Award and performed with the Virginia Symphony. With an added passion for language arts, including both French and Latin, she has taken the National Latin Scholars Exam.

 

Webster is president of Student Council and the Beta Club and a member of the Science Club at Dan River High School, where she also plays softball and volleyball. Outside of school, she works for Chick-Fil-A and has joined their marketing team. She also is active at her church, serving the area homeless and traveling abroad on mission trips.

 

Winter, a home-schooled student, is an avid musician, playing both the piano and drums. She is a member of the worship team at Amelia Community Church and edits Chesterfield Christian Academy’s newsletter and yearbook. In addition, she coaches a recreation league soccer team and teaches physical education to home-schooled students at the U-Turn Sports Academy.

 

The remaining 13 students selected to compete in the Presidential Scholars competition -- Alisha Abbey of Bluefield, West Virginia; Andrea Armbrester of Stuart, Virginia; Heather Bailey of North Tazewell, Virginia; Rachel Cochran of Chantilly, Virginia; Ciera Jayne Conkle of Douglassville, Pennsylvania; Dakota Duckworth of Daleville, Virginia; Kate Keukelaar of Macedon, New York; Junetta Nuckels of Richlands, Virginia; Matthew Raner of Summerfield, North Carolina; Peirce Rigney of Pulaski, Virginia; John Paul Shackelford of Rose Hill, Virginia; Ashley Van Meter of Lincolnton, North Carolina; and Shelby Wolfe of Pittsboro, North Carolina -- received other competitive financial aid packages.

 

Bluefield’s Presidential Scholars Day also included a luncheon for the prospective students and their families, along with a keynote address from Harry Snodgrass, associate professor and chair of the Division of Business, who spoke about the benefits of a Christ-centered liberal arts education.

 

 

 

 

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